Tech Marketing

BHW1 and BHW1 staff have worked on a broad range of technology projects, including startups, product introductions, technology pivots, and many others. And perhaps more so than in any other sector, differentiation is a key factor—in B2B technology and B2C technology. Some foundational principles we stress for all tech-centric brands:

1.  Know Who You Are

It’s pretty basic, isn’t it? Unfortunately, basic doesn’t always mean easy. Some companies have a strong sense of who they are; for instance, the company may have a dynamic founder with a singular vision. Others have a difficult time defining who they are as they work with stakeholders ranging from attorneys to engineers to investors. To simplify that, we always suggest this: ask the market. Seriously. Who you are is less defined by what you think, and always more defined by what the market thinks. If need be, don’t be afraid to pivot. As an example, we have worked with a tech company that introduced a product marketed on safety features; secondary messages focused on performance. But when the product was introduced, the market focused on the performance aspect…and the safety messages took a back seat. Our client was agile enough to re-engineer and re-introduce the product based on performance. In other words, the company thought they were about safety; the market told them they were about performance. The market always wins.

2.  Know How You’re Different

It’s another basic axiom about marketing: the value proposition. But it’s excruciatingly important in the world of technology. Unless you’ve created and owned a new category (in which case: congratulations), you will have to position yourself against other competitors. Know which salient points tie to market needs, and know how to position yourself against competitors on your strengths…and your weaknesses.

3.  Know Your Vocabulary

The world of technology is filled with three letter acronyms and long noun phrases. As a tech firm develops a solution for the marketplace, it will undoubtedly develop its own internal lingo. Unfortunately, it will be meaningless to an external audience. For instance, your engineering department may love to throw around the term “wireless inductive coupling and charging unit” a lot; your marketing, however, will be much better served if you call it a “magnetic charger.” Better yet, invent a name for it (MagnaCharge?), trademark the term, and claim it as an exclusive. (Sometimes it’s good to invent the lingo as part of your marketing.)

4.  Know Your Results

In more simplistic terms: test everything. Research everything. Your technology, your trademarks, your marketing. Everything. We live in a world that lets us measure metrics for messaging, so it’s a competitive advantage if you can define and capture those metrics. Testing can give you valuable insight into both qualitative factors (product packaging, color schemes, product names) and quantitative factors (order volume, website entry points, abandon rates).

Our staff experience in the technology sector includes:
Antenna 79
AT&T
Novell
Cirque Corporation
Purcell Systems
Intellipaper
Connect Northwest
Pearson Packaging
Itron
Motorola

Featured
Examples

Reach Antenna National iPhone 6 Antenna Packaging

Reach Antenna National iPhone 6 Antenna Packaging

 

 

Reach 79 Case Custom Photography

Reach 79 Case Custom Photography

 

 

Reach 79 National iPhone 6 Case Packaging

Reach 79 National iPhone 6 Case Packaging

 

 

 

 

National Best Buy Circular Ads

National Best Buy Circular Ads

 

 

Pearson Packaging Mechanic's Ales

As part of a direct mail campaign, BHW1 created the Mechanic’s Ale label designs. The bottles, filled with candy and mailed to potential customers, were used to highlight available products and services.

Pearson Packaging Mechanic's Ales

 

 

Intellipaper Technology Video

 

 

 

 

Purcell Systems Technology Animated Video